Statement of the Ministry of Public Works and Public Housing on the Shooting of Workers on the Bridge Construction in Papua

Jakarta –  Amid the serious efforts of the Government through the Ministry of Public Works and Public Housing (PUPR) to build infrastructure for equitable development in our country, especially those related to increasing inter-region connectivity to open isolated areas in Papua Province, an incident was perpetrated namely a shooting on the construction workers of the Aorak Kali Bridge (KM 102 + 525) and the Kali Yigi Bridge (KM 103 + 975) in Yigi District, Nduga District, Papua Province. The two bridge projects are part of Trans Papua segment 5, namely Wamena – Habema – Mugi – Kenyam – Batas Batu – Mumugu segment with a length of 278.6 km.

Based on information from the Papua Police Public Relations, December 3, 2018, the fatal shooting of workers from PT. Istaka Karya that occurred on Sunday, December 2, 2018 was allegedly done by the Armed Criminal Separatist Group (KKSB). We are still waiting for Confirmation from the Police and the Armed Forces on the number of workers who perished, sustained injuries and survived.

In response to the above, the Minister of Public Works and Public Housing (PUPR) Basuki Hadimuljono conveyed several important matters at the press conference, on December 4, 2018 in the Press Room of the Ministry of PUPR, Jakarta, as follows:

  1. We were shocked and deeply regret the re-occurrence of shooting on the construction workers of the Kali Yigi Bridge and the Aorak River Bridge on the Wamena – Habema – Kenyam – Batas Batu – Mumugu Section. We would convey our deep sorrow to the families of the workers from PT. Istaka Karya that fell victim.;
  2. We reiterate that the construction of the Wamena – Habema – Mugi – Kenyam – Batas Batu – Mumugu section is a priority program in President Joko Widodo’s and Vice President Jusuf Kalla’s Working Cabinet, as the implementation of Nawacita’s vision of “Building from the Periphery”. Bapak Jokowi happened to come on a working visit to directly monitor the progress of road construction on this section on May 10, 2017, and assigned the Ministry of PUPR to accelerate the completion of the construction of roads and bridges on the section;
  3. The construction of roads and bridges on this section has long been awaited by the local community and therefore received strong support from the people of Papua because it will be the closest route from the Port of Mumugu to the residents in the Central Mountains region. The existence of these roads is vital to reduce the cost of logistics and lower the level of expensiveness in the Central Mountains region of Papua;
  4. Between 2016 and 2019, the Ministry of PUPR through the Papua XVIII National Road Implementation Center, Directorate General of Highways, has programmed the construction of 35 bridges on the Wamena – Habema – Mugi – Kenyam – Batas Batu – Mumugu section to complete the whole road infrastructure, of which the details are as follows :
    • 14 bridges are being undertaken by PT Istaka Karya with a contract value of Rp 184 billion, where the construction of 11 bridges is under implementation, and 3 bridges will start construction in 2019;
    • 21 bridges are being undertaken by PT Brantas Abipraya with a contract value of Rp 246.8 billion where the construction of 5 bridges has been completed (Gat III Bridge, Gat II, Arwana, Merek and Wusi), while 9 bridges are under implementation (al Kali Kotek I, Kali Wolgilik, Kali Jun, Kali Labi, Kali Abeak, Kali Simal, Kali Moit, Kali Dumit and Kali Rora). But, since 4 months this was stopped due to a serious secuirity disturbance with victims. 7 bridges will start construction work in 2019;
    • Without bridges, road users must cross the river on this section. At present the construction of the 35 bridges has been 70% completed.
  5. Considering the above mentioned matters, starting today (Tuesday, December 4, 2018) we will temporarily suspend the construction of bridges on the Wamena – Habema – Mugi – Kenyam – Batas Batu – Mumugu segments and will resume work according to the recommendations of the TNI and Polri;
  6. For this reason, we fully support the efforts and quick steps of the security forces, both TNI and Polri, to find and to take firm action against the perpetrators so as to create a conducive atmosphere for staff, contractors and consultants who work for and on behalf of the Ministry of PUPR and the Ministry / Other Institutions to build infrastructure for the realization of social justice and welfare in Papua;

Papua Separatists Group Killed 31 Civilian Workers in Nduga

Jayapura – On Monday 03 December 2018 around 15:30. local time, the police had been informed that there had been killing of the PT Istaka Karya workers who were building bridges in Yigi River and Aurak River. It is informed that the killings of the workers occurred on Saturday and Sunday, 1-2 December 2018 in Yigi River and Aurak River, Nduga Regency, Province of Papua.

“31 people, according to report that we received, had been killed,” Head of Public Relation of Papua Regional Police, Ahmad Musthofa Kamal told CNN Indonesia via SMS, Tuesday (4/12)

Kamal explained that the suspected group initially killed 24 workers, on Saturday (1/12). Then, eight other workers fled and hid in the house of one of the local legislators. However, on Sunday (2/12), the group came to the house and executed seven of them.

“On Sunday they were visited by the group and executed. Seven people were shot dead, one person was unknown,” Kamal said, when interviewed by CNN Indonesia. “The group is still in Nduga,” he said.

The police then coordinated with the military and tried to get to the scene. However, the personnel have not been able to enter the location because the road access was blocked by the group, on Tuesday (3/12) before sunset.
“Our members have not yet arrived at the crime scene, the road to the crime scene was blocked,” Kamal said.

Earlier on Saturday, December 1, 2018 at around 20:30 local time, Mr. Cahyo (Project Manager of PT. Istika Karya Habema-Mugi bridge construction package) received a call from a number normally held by Mr. Jhoni (Field Coordinator of PT. Istika Karya working on the construction of the Habema-Mugi bridge project) but Mr. Cahyo did not understand what the person calling was talking about.

Mr. Jhoni (Field Coordinator of PT. Istika Karya is working on the construction of the Habema-Mugi bridge project, which is currently carrying out the construction of bridges in Aurak River, Umtlat River, Yigi River, Nigidirik River, in Yigi District of Nduga Regency). Last communication with Mr. Jhoni was via SMS on November 30, 2018.

Meanwhile, information from the 755 / Yalet Satgaspamrahwan post in Napua-Wamena said that on November 30, 2018 at 04.00, a car was registered with Mr. MS as the driver carrying diesel fuel owned by PT. Istaka Karya heading to the Istaka Karya Camp in Yigi District and brought 5 employees. The car arrived back in Wamena at 18.30.

Then on December 1, 2018 at 2:00, there were 2 cars heading to Yigi District Camp each carrying 15 workers of PT Istaka Karya. On December 2, 2018, at 20.00. 1 Strada car returned to Wamena and on Monday 3 December 2018, the car returned from Wamena to Mbua District, Nduga Regency.

One of the cars carrying 15 project workers from PT Istaka Karya has yet to return to Wamena. Receiving this information on Monday, December 3, 2018 at 15.30, joint police and military personnel led by the Head of Ops for Jayawijaya Regional Police, AKP. R.L. Stageary left from Wamena to Yigi District, Nduga Regency, but when they arrived at kilometer 46, the team met with a car from the direction of Bua District and informed them that the road was blocked.

Papua Police PR Head, Ahmad Musthofa Kamal, S.H said that currently the joint TNI / Polri personnel had been deployed to check the information and were always ready to evacuate the victims and arrest the perpetrators.

13 Regencies in Papua Generate USD 8.4 Million from Agriculture Products

By Akfa Nasrulhak – detikFinance

Jakarta – The Ministry of Village, Development of Disadvantaged Regions, and Transmigration (Ministry of PDTT) together with the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) checks and validates the Self-sustain Village Development Program (PPMD) in Abrose Village, Ransiki District, South Manokwari, West Papua.

Head of Sub-directorate of Technology Efficiency (Kasubdit TTG), Directorate of Natural Resource Utilization (PSDA) of the Directorate General of Community Development and Empowerment (DG PPMD) of PDTT Ministry of Agriculture, Anastutik Wiryaningsih revealed that the PPMD ​​activities have been implemented since March 2017 and will end on 31 December 2018.

“In this period we carried out capacity building and community empowerment programs, especially in agriculture,” Anastutik said in a written statement on Thursday (11/08/2018).

Anastutik revealed that there were 13 districts where 6 districts in Papua and 7 districts in West Papua were targeted by the program and received funding in the form of grants and loans of USD 8.4 million from IFAD.

“The community is given training starting from cultivation or processing of chocolate or cocoa, seaweed, vanilla, to empowering women. The community is also taught to save their income and so on,” said Anastutik.

According to Anastutik, the year before PPDM came in, the community in Abrose complained about their cocoa plants being affected by tree diseases.

“Because the treatment were not good, cocoa has been stricken with disease. We gave proper treatment exercises. Now their cocoa is healthy and produce more,” she said.

PPDM has also succeeded in helping farmers to send 4 tons of seaweed from Fak Fak to Surabaya.

“In Fak Fak, seaweed is only valued at Rp. 6,000 per kg, in Surabaya the price can reach Rp. 18,000 per kg,” she said.

During the visit, Anastutik also took time to meet one of the 30 residents who were members of the PPMD ​​program, Helena (60). Wearing a shirt with a picture of Monas and Bajaj bearing the Jakarta sign, Helena came out to meet the group from the Ministry of PDTT and IFAD in her newly built house in the middle of lush cocoa plants around her.

The location is not far from the Village Development and Community Empowerment Service (PPMK) of Ransiki District which is also the Capital of South Manokwari Regency, West Papua. Precisely in the village or village of Abrose which is on the roadside towards the city of Manokwari.

Helena, who was accompanied by Village Assistant Abrose Abdul Rahim Arkan Semoryai, said that the group’s success with the Independent Village Development Program (PPDM) was initiated by the Ministry of Defense PDTT and IFAD.

“We were taught how to take care of our cocoa, to cut, harvest, store and to dry,” said Helena.

Meanwhile, IFAD’s Country Program Officer Anissa Lucky Pratiwi said, in addition to conducting training to improve community skills in agriculture, IFAD is also starting to focus on how people in these villages can sell their produces.

“After they produce products in the agricultural sector, we also begin to think about how they can sell them to improve the community’s economy,” said Anissa who has participated in community empowerment programs in Indonesia for approximately 8 years. .

Funds from IFAD are used to organize various trainings in agriculture from planting, harvesting, post-harvest production, to marketing agricultural products. To support the training, various interactive and interesting modules are made that are easy to use

News Source: Detik Finance

Pic. Source: Flickr

Electricity now Reaches Kwaebandan Village in Papua

Illustration: Electricity reaches Kampung Enem, Mappi, Papua

JAKARTA – The Bright Papua Expedition (Ekspedisi Papua Terang – EPT) carried out by the State Electricity Company (PT PLN Persero) has shown the results. Kwaedamban Village, Borme District, Pegunungan Bintang Regency, is now currently electrified.

Based on a report from PLN, a total of 36 houses in Kwaebandan Village have now been electrified from a hydro power plant (Piko Hidro) with a capacity of 1 kilo watt (KW) which was built near the village.

“Thanks to PLN, Thanks also to students who have participated in the Bright Papua Expedition. Our appreciation for the efforts that have been made, including support from the community, traditional leaders and the local regional government who are both hand in hand,” said the Deputy for Energy, Logistics, Regional and Tourism Affairs at the Ministry of State Enterprises (BUMN), Edwin Hidayat Abdullah in a written statement received in Jakarta, Monday (10/29).

According to Edwin, the Ministry continues to encourage the optimal role of PLN to provide electricity to the community, especially by utilizing natural potentials as electric energy sources.

“Hopefully it will be followed by other villages in Papua. The Ministry of BUMN continues to provide support and ensure that other villages in the Papua and West Papua regions will also be electrified,” said Edwin.

In addition PLN will also provide electricity in the Borme District by increasing the capacity of existing power plants or adding new power plants that utilize river water flow in the region.

Thus, the presence of electricity in both the Kwaedamban Village and the Borme District will stimulate the economic of the local community. In addition to lighting in homes, electricity  will be used for lighting in public facilities such as schools, hospitals, places of worship and channeled to support communication services in the local area.

PLN General Manager of Papua and West Papua Region (WP2B), Ari Dartomo said, at this time the expedition team is verifying data provided by PLN WP2B to get accurate data.

Roads for Communities

Yulia Indri Sari and Erman Rahman / THE JAKARTA POST

Jakarta

Trans-Papua roads connecting Wamena-Habema-Kenyam-Mumugu. Source: Viva.co.id

The government has prioritized infrastructure development in Papua and West Papua provinces, particularly to improve road connectivity. It has been argued that connectivity brings numerous potential livelihood opportunities to indigenous Papuans and improves access to other basic services and social interaction.

The Asia Foundation, in partnership with the Indonesian institute of Sciences (LIPI), recently conducted a rapid assessment of two road routes between Sorong and Manokwari in West Papua, and between Jayapura and Wamena in Papua to measure implications of road construction for the Papuans well-being.

Most national and trans-Papua roadshave been built since the New Order Era. But according to drivers and regular road users interviewed, road conditions have significantly improved since 2014. Access to Bintuni from Manokwari; to Sausapor from Sorong in West Papua; and to Elelifrom Abenaho in Papua, for instance, have undergone continuous improvements in the last four years, including through road soil compaction, construction of bridges and paving with asphalt.

Drivers of Hilux taxis (four-wheel-drive cars) no longer worry about getting stuck over night when it rains as unpaved dirt roads (the “red roads”) have been compacted. In other road sections, even smaller cars have replaced Hilux – reflecting relatively good pavement. Even ojek (motorcycletaxis) and regular modes of public transportation like angkot (minivans) and Damri government buses are operating – which to Papuans are the ultimate signs of better roads.

These public transportation optionsreduce their travel time and costs. In Pelebaga, Jayawijaya regency,mama (women) used to carry one noken (Papuan Basket) of farm produce on foot for one to two hours to get to the market and another four to five hours on their way back uphill. After the upgrading of the Wamena-Habema road segment, ojek and taxis became available to them. Now, the women can hire taxis at a cost of Rp 20,000 (US$1.30), with a travel time of only 15 to 30 minutes, and double their sales to two noken full of produce, increasing profits by Rp50,000 to Rp 100,000.

Mama living in coastal and-relatively urbanized areas are more able to benefit from this new opportunity.They have started expanding the market for their agricultural produce to farther and larger urban centers such as Sorong, Jayapura and Manokwari. This has increased their incomes by Rp. 150,000 to Rp. 300,000 per week.

However, most of them spend their additional income on consumable goods. Improved connectivity has significantly increased the accessibility of Papuans to goodssuch as rice, soap, flavor enhancers such as monosodium glutamate, instant noodles, cigarettes, salt, “colored” drinks and various snacks, as well as construction materials.

New merchants, mostly migrants, are the ones more ready to seize the opportunity and bring these goods to the communities. Some villagers also collectively rent cars to purchase consumable goods and construction materials at lower prices in the nearest urban centers. The implication is a more significant need for cash to buy all these goods.

Increased connectivity and household demand for cash – complemented by increased village budgets (over Rp 1 billion per village on average) that have been used mostly for housing – have increased demand for construction materials, particularly wood.And here lies the problem: men respond to the situation by cutting down more trees and selling them mostly to outsider log traders who finance them. They have also become more dependent on government social assistance and projects.

Lack of support for other types of local economic development has limited the alternative livelihoods available to them, other than utilizing natural resources. Better road connectivity, understandably, also leads to utilization of land along the roads for new villages and agricultural land. Hence, more trees are being, or will be, cut down.


Trans-Papua roads connecting Wamena-Habema-Kenyam-Mumugu. Source: Viva.co.id

Fortunately,such environmental degradation has not been amplified by significantly increased large private investment. Hence, only existing extractive industries already operating in the two provinces have mostly become better off (and degraded the environment) by utilizing the improved connectivity.

Socially,indigenous Papuans enjoy improved connectivity as families meet more often. But they are also wary of the impact of roads on the influx of migrants. While they consider migrants an integral part of their daily lives – selling them basic needs, providing cheaper and faster modes of transportation, buying the produce and wood they sell and providing skilled labor for construction work – Papuans have also expressed concern over the migrants greater ability to seize the economic opportunities presented by connectivity improvements.

In some highland areas, this has led to restrictions on migrant sellers and the operating hours of migrant ojek drivers.

However, indigenous Papuans speak profoundly on the importance of the roads to access health,education and population administration services, provided mainly in the urban centers.

Our rapid assessment also found positive consequences of improved connectivity inthe quality of health services.

In Wamena, this has given local health clinic staff a better sense of security, hence encouraging longer service hours. However, in education the opposite has happened; teachers have a perverse incentive to leave schools to move to the urban centers instead.

The rapid assessment suggests there is room to reconsider infrastructure development strategies in Papua and West Papua.

The most important infrastructure in the two provinces is the roads connecting where indigenous Papuans live in the villages with the municipality and regency capitals where basic services are mainly provided.

This should be complemented by improving basic services. Including support to improve micro-sale agriculture that would gradually increase the production level from subsistence to a level that can improve food (and nutrition) security at the local levels – a strategy to support the visions of the two provinces to promote sustainable development, as discussed at the international conference on biodiversity, creative economy and ecotourism in Manokwari on Oct. 7 to 10.

The mainstream approach of improving inter-regency and inter-province connectivity, aiming for increased large private investment, does not seem suitable to these two provinces.

With current roads in better shape, gradual improvement of human development indicators, rather than economic growth, should now be the main development target in Papua and West Papua. As one Papuan warned, “we need infrastructure for communities, not commodities”.

This article is originally published on The Jakarta Post, written by Yulia Indri Sari, who has completed her doctoral research on community driven development in Papua for the Australian National University in Canberra and Erman Rahman who holds a Master’s degree in transportation and is senior director for programs at The Asia Foundation. Please contact us should you wish to share your opinion.

Papua Provincial Government Prepares Aid of 4.2 Billion for Palu


Papua Governor sent a team of health workers to help victims and survivors in disaster-hit areas in Central Sulawesi

The Papua Provincial Government is preparing aid of IDR 4.2 billion (USD 280,000) for victims of the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Palu, Sigi and Donggala, Central Sulawesi. Papua Governor Lukas Enembe in Jayapura on Thursday said the aid was collected not only by the provincial government, but also by the districts and cities in Papua.

Earlier this week, Papua Provincial Government also sent a medical team to help victims and survivors in disaster-hit areas in Central Sulawesi.

“Today (18/10) we assembled a team from Papua to go to Palu to hand over the cash assistance in accordance with what was conveyed to President Joko Widodo when met some time ago,” he explained.

He hoped that people of Palu, Sigi, and Donggala affected by the disaster will be quickly recovered, the damaged infrastructure will soon be rebuilt, and the local government will resume normal activities and serve the community.

“We are optimistic that the Central Sulawesi Provincial Government and the Indonesian Government are able to solve everything, despite the earthquake that is indeed a major problem for Indonesia,” he said.

He explained that Indonesia is prone to earthquakes, so that all parties should think about how to build earthquake-resistant infrastructure, because if not, the people would continue to be victims.

In line with Lukas Enembe, Acting Head of the Papua Province Regional Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD), William R. Manderi, said that on Sunday (10/21), the team of six people would leave for Palu to hand over the funds, led by the Assistant for Government Affairs of the Papua Provincial Secretariat, Doren Wakerwa.

Source: Antaranews.com

Papua Sends Medical Team to Palu

By Nethy Dharma Somba / The Jakarta Post


Papua Deputy Governor Klemen Tinal helps put a uniform vest on a health worker.

(Jayapura, Fri, 12/10). The Papua administration has dispatched a medical team to Palu, Central Sulawesi, to provide medical services following a strong earthquake and tsunami that impacted the region.

The team, comprising 10 medical workers, two Social Agency officials as well as two Papua Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD) officials, departed for Makassar, South Sulawesi, on Thursday, and will continue their journey to Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu from there.

Papua Health Agency head Aloysius Giay said the team was taking medical supplies for diarrhea and upper respiratory tract infections, as well as food supplies.

“The team will stay in Palu for 10 days,” Aloysius said, adding that they would be focused on healthcare services.

“As we all know, there are many diseases that afflict people after disasters,” he added.

Previously, Papua Governor Lukas Enembe said the province would donate Rp 4 billion (US$ 263,032) to help with reconstruction.

Source: The Jakarta Post